Free English Course Online 12

Free English Course Online 12

Today’s Focus:

  • Vocabulary related to
  • much or many? countable and uncountable nouns

1/ Vocabulary Practice

  • the dog runs
  • in the park
  • Many
  • many dogs
  • safe
  • to be safe
  • it is not safe
  • a road roads
  • on the road
  • much 
  • too much traffic
  • a friend friends
  • to have many friends
  • much time
  • to count 
  • i can count
  • to count something
  • a task tasks
  • to clean
  • to cook
  • to learn
  • time 
  • minutes
  • How much time?
  • How many minutes?
  • There is
  • there are
  • many students
  • at school
  • not much work
  • One Two Three
  • Four Five Six
  • Seven Eight Nine
  • Ten Eleven Twelve

2/ Grammar Practice

“Many” or “much”?

Nouns can be put into different categories such as plural and singular, but also countable and countable.

Countable nouns = we can count them

They have a singular and a plural form.

i.e.

“car” is a countable noun

a car

cars, two cars…

The car is mine.

The cars are his.

Uncountable nouns = we can’t count them

They only have one form, the singular form. They do not have a plural form so they always use a singular verb. They cannot use the articles “a”, “an” or a number (one, two, three…) before them.

i.e.

“butter” is an uncountable noun

butter

butters (does not exist)

a butter (does not exist)

two butters (does not exist)

Countable nouns are very common (a sister, a classroom, a friend, a teacher…). So how can I recognise uncountable nouns?

Uncountable nouns are often:

  • abstract ideas: love, beauty…
  • liquids or gases: water, milk, air, coffee…
  • materials: wood, gold, paper…
  • food (certain foods generally cut into small parts): bread, cheese, pasta…
  • made of smaller parts: sugar, rice…
  • others: advice, work, news, furniture, information, luggage, money…

When we are talking about a large or small quantity we can use “lots of” or “a lot of” with both countable and uncountable nouns:

  • “language” is a countable noun > I speak lots of languages. I speak a lot of languages. / I don’t speak lots of languages. I don’t speak a lot of languages.
  • “coffee” is an uncountable noun > I drink lots of coffee. I drink a lot of coffee. / I don’t drink lots of coffee. I don’t drink a lot of coffee.

We can also use “many” with countable nouns and “much” with uncountable nouns, when talking about a large or small quantity (in a positive or a negative statement):

  • “lesson” is a countable noun > I have lots of English lessons. I have a lot of English lessons. > I have many English lessons./ I don’t have lots of English lessons. I don’t have a lot of English lessons. I don’t have many English lessons.
  • “work” is an uncountable noun > I have lots of work. I have a lot of work. > I have much work. / I don’t have lots of work. I don’t have a lot of work. I don’t have much work.

3/ Sentence Practice

  1. The dog runs in the park. I have a dog. There are many dogs in the park. They run in the park because it is safe.
  2. It is not safe to run on the road. There are many cars on the road. There is too much traffic.
  3. I have many friends, I have one, two, three friends. I do not have much time. I can count my many friends but I can’t count time.
  4. I have many tasks and I have too much work. I can count my tasks. I clean, I cook, I learn. I cant count my work
  5. If I can count something, I can say many, If I can’t count something I say much.
  6. One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve.
  7. How much time? How many minutes
  8. I learn English with my Teacher. I run in the park with my dog.
  9. There are many students at my school. There is not much work today.

4/ Practice Quiz

Complete the quizzes below.

  1. Today’s words: 
  2. Today’s grammar and sentences: 

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