Causative verbs with exercises and examples lesson 54




In this English lesson 54 we explain,”Causative Verbs”, in English

"Causative Verbs"
All you need to know about “Causative Verbs”, in English

Dialogue

1/ Sentence Practice

John wakes up feeling a little groggy but a lot better.

John has had his operation and he had his appendix removed.

This morning he is going to have his breakfast brought to him in bed.

He is having his room cleaned and they are going to make his bed.

He has his bed made twice a day

His wife Susan has come to see him.

She has had her hair done yesterday. She has her hair done every month.

She is going to have her fingernails done this afternoon.

Hello John sorry I’m late but I had Janet on the phone. She has had her car stolen.

The police are said to be studying the possibility that the car was used in a hold-up.

The car is believed to be a write-off.

That’s a shame and I must say I am felling one hundred times better already.

Any news from work?

They had the monthly audit done and everything is OK.

They have had the computers checked.

Janet and David are having their house decorated and we got invited to their wedding anniversary in September.

Some chocolates were taken to John by Susan.

Vocabulary

2/ Vocabulary Practice

  • Causative
  • causative verbs
  • objects
  • passing reporting verbs
  • to wake up
  • feeling a little groggy
  • a lot better.
  • he had his appendix removed.
  • breakfast in bed.
  • brought to
  • to make a bed.
  • twice a day
  • to have one’s hair done
  • every month
  • fingernails
  •  afternoon.
  • sorry, I’m late
  • to have on the phone.
  • stolen.
  • to be studying the possibility that
  • a hold-up.
  • is believed to be
  • a write-off.
  • That’s a shame
  • one hundred times better already.
  • Any news from?
  • the monthly audit
  • everything is OK.
  • to be checked
  • house decorated
  • we got invited to
  • wedding anniversary
  • in September
  • Some chocolates

Grammar

Causative Verbs

Causative verbs include “have”, “get”, “make”, “let”, and “help”.

They cause something else to happen.

HAVE = giving Someone Else The Responsibility To Do Something

1/ HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form, infinitive without “to”, bare infinitive)

I will have the receptionist email you the timetable.

Could you have your assistant call me to reschedule the appointment?

2/ HAVE + OBJECT + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB

I am going to have my car fixed this week.

She always has her hair done at the same hairdresser’s.

I need to have my watch repaired.

GET

1/ = giving Someone Else The Responsibility To Do Something – In informal speech.

GET + PERSON + VERB WITHOUT “TO”

I will get the receptionist to email you the timetable.

Could you get your assistant to call me to reschedule the appointment?

2/ = giving Someone Else The Responsibility To Do Something – In informal speech.

GET + OBJECT + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB

I am going to get my car fixed this week.

She always gets her hair done at the same hairdresser’s.

I need to get my watch repaired.

3/ = convincing or encouraging somebody to do something

GET + PERSON + TO + VERB WITH “TO”

How can I get them to all attend?

I can never get the kids to do their chores.

They got him to work for free.

He got me to try this new French restaurant.

MAKE = Forcing or requiring somebody to do something

MAKE + PERSON + VERB (base form, infinitive without “to”, bare infinitive)

They made him apologise for being so rude.

His parents made him pay for the repairs.

He makes me watch every episode; he loves that series!

We were made to resit the exam because someone had cheated.

Similar to “REQUIRE”:

REQUIRE + PERSON + INFINITIVE WITH – generally used for rules

They require everyone to showering before entering the swimming pool.

They require passengers to fasten their seatbelt when seated.

Similar to “FORCE”:

FORCE + PERSON + INFINITIVE WITH “TO” – generally used to express violence or extreme pressure

They thieves forced them to get out of their car.

They forced them to name their accomplice.

LET = Permitting something to Happen

LET + PERSON/OBJECT + INFINITIVE WITHOUT “TO”

Can I let the dog out?

Don’t let them watch too much TV!

They don’t let us eat at our desks.

Similar to “PERMIT”:

We are not permitted to eat lunch at our desks.

He doesn’t permit it.

Similar to “ALLOW”

We are not allowed to eat lunch at our desks.

He doesn’t allow it.

HELP = Assisting somebody In doing something

1/ HELP + PERSON + VERB WITHOUT “TO”

=

2/ HELP + PERSON + TO + VERB WITH “TO”

Both forms are correct. Without “to” is sometimes more commonly used:

He helped me learn French.

He helped me to learn French.

They helped me carry the boxes up the stairs.

They helped me to carry the boxes up the stairs.

English Speaking Practise

Questions and Answers

Did you have your bike stolen?

No, I forgot where I left it, that’s all.

Will you soon have your car running?

Yes, hopefully it will be ready for the weekend.

What time shall we set off?

As soon as I get the car fixed.

Did you get the man to deliver your shopping?

I did get him to do it, thanks.

I’d like that finished by nightfall, is that understood?

It will be finished long before.

Has Susan come to see you yet?

Yes, she has just left.

Any news from work?

Nothing yet, it’s too early.

What time are you having your hair done?

At the usual time, around three o’clock.

How many times do you eat a day?

Three or four, it depends.

Is the car a write off?

No, it can be fixed.

nglish Pronunciation

YY
,  and welcome.Today let’s look at a long vowel sound or , your lips are forward and very rounded in an oval shape, the front of your tongue must be down near the front of your mouth, so not too tense. Your bottom jaw is down: or, saw, orbit, bought, small autumn, caught, crawl.

Let’s repeat

or, saw, orbit, bought, small autumn, caught, crawl.

Now tests time, how would you pronounce these words?

The answer is daughter, thought, wall.That’s it for today see you soon.

Lesson 54 recap with Julia.

Conditional Clauses or If Clauses explained in English Lesson 51
Reported speech exercises and examples in English in Lesson 52
Passive voice exercises and examples explained in lesson 53
Causative verbs with exercises and examples lesson 54
Compound nouns explained with English with exercises and examples Lesson 55
All, no, none, each every either neither exercises pdf Lesson 56
Indefinite Pronouns examples some any or no explained in English Lesson 57
Order of adjectives exercises with explanations in English Lesson 58
Spelling rules of adverbs explained in English, Lesson 59
Superlatives and comparatives pdf explained in English Lesson 60
prepositional verbs with meanings and explanations Lesson 61
Time expressions and tenses explained in English Lesson 62
phrasal verbs list with an explanation in English Lesson 63
Transitive and intransitive phrasal verbs definition in English Lesson 64
list of conjunctions in english with examples explained Lesson 65
Difference between relative pronouns and relative clauses in English 66
Relative pronouns examples with explanations in English Lesson 67
Adverbial clauses with examples and exercises Lesson 68
Expressions of time present continuous and other tenses Lesson 69
Present simple and present continuous exercises pdf English Lesson 70

Exercises Lesson 54

Comprehension Practice

Vocabulary Practice

Grammar Practice



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