How many or how much exercises in English Beginners Course Lesson 23




 

This English tutorial is focusing on how much? How many? Revision of countable and uncountable nouns.

Revision of countable and uncountable nouns.
how much? How many? Revision of countable and uncountable nouns.

Dialogue

 1/English Sentence Practice with how many or how much exercises.

The food is very good. John asks ” how many more dishes are coming?

That’s it. Have we got any toothpicks on the table? No, I will ask the waiter to bring some.

Excuse me. do you mind bringing some toothpicks, please? The good-looking waitress nods and smiles

The waitress is walking towards the table with some spoons. She does not understand.

They say “never mind” and they ask for the bill. How much is it? We will go halves, fifty-fifty.

That was good fun and we will do it again sometime. I will ask the waiter to get our things.

How are you getting home? I will take a taxi to Victoria Station and I will take the Bus from there.

I’m lucky I will take the tube, my flat is just six stops away. I will get home in time to watch the Rugby highlights.

Good luck and now that you have my number we can meet up again soon.

Peter waves at a taxi. A taxi stops just a few yards in front but a couple jump in before him. That makes him angry.

Never mind another one arrives immediately.

Vocabulary

2/English Vocabulary Practice

  • the food
  • how many
  • more
  • dishes
  • Have we got any…?
  • tooth-picks
  • on the table
  • the waiter
  • to bring
  • do you mind
  • good-looking
  • waitress
  • to nod
  • to smile
  • walking towards
  • some spoons
  • never mind
  • the bill
  • How much is it?
  • to go halves
  • fifty-fifty
  • good fun
  • do it again
  • How are you getting home?
  • to take a taxi
  • take the bus
  • from there.
  • to be lucky
  • to take the tube
  • the flat
  • six stops away
  • get home
  • to watch
  • the Rugby highlights
  • a number
  • to meet up
  • again soon
  • a few yards in front
  • a couple
  • to jump in
  • to make someone angry
  • immediately

English Grammar

English Grammar with  how many or how much exercises.

How many or How much?

When we are asking about the quantity or amount of something we use How many or How much at the beginning of our question.

How many + countable noun

We want to know the amount or quantity.

How many plural countable noun

How much + uncountable noun

We want to find out the price, quantity or amount of something.

How much + singular or plural noun + verb “to cost” / “to be” to know the price of something

How much is the jacket?

How much are the jackets?

How much are they?

How much did it cost?

How much will this all cost?

How much will this cost me?

How much + uncountable noun to know the quantity or amount of something.

How much time do we need to get there?

How much water do you drink per day?

How much money did they spend?

How much milk is left in the fridge?

>> If what we are talking about is obvious, it is quite common to omit the noun in the question:

How much do you need?

How many were there?

How much is it?

Revision of “Many” or “much”?

countable and uncountable nouns

Let’s learn how to identify countable and uncountable nouns!

Nouns can be put into different categories such as plural and singular, but also countable and uncountable.

Countable nouns = we can count them

They have a singular and a plural form.

i.e.

“car” is a countable noun

a car

cars, two cars…

The car is mine.

The cars are his.

Uncountable nouns = we can’t count them

They only have one form, the singular form. They do not have a plural form so they always use a singular verb. They cannot use the articles “a”, “an” or a number (one, two, three…) before them.

i.e.

“butter” is an uncountable noun

butter

butters (does not exist)

a butter (does not exist)

two butters (does not exist)

Countable nouns are very common (a sister, a classroom, a friend, a teacher…). So how can I recognise uncountable nouns?

Uncountable nouns are often:

  • abstract ideas: love, beauty…
  • liquids or gases: water, milk, air, coffee…
  • materials: wood, gold, paper…
  • food (certain foods generally cut into small parts): bread, cheese, pasta…
  • made of smaller parts: sugar, rice…
  • other: advice, work, news, furniture, information, luggage, money…

When we are talking about a large quantity we can use “lots of” or “a lot of” with both countable and uncountable nouns:

  • “language” is a countable noun > I speak lots of languages. I speak a lot of languages. / I don’t speak lots of languages. I don’t speak a lot of languages.
  • “coffee” is an uncountable noun > I drink lots of coffee. I drink a lot of coffee. / I don’t drink lots of coffee. I don’t drink a lot of coffee.

We can also use “many” with countable nouns and “much” with uncountable nouns, when talking about a large or small quantity (in a positive or a negative statement):

  • “lesson” is a countable noun  1/ I have lots of English lessons. – I don’t have lots of English lessons. 2/ I have a lot of English lessons. – I don’t have a lot of English lessons. 3/ I have many English lessons. – I don’t have many English lessons.
  • “work” is an uncountable noun > I have lots of work. I have a lot of work. > I have much work. / I don’t have lots of work. I don’t have a lot of work. I don’t have much work.

Revision of the Modal Verb “WILL”

WILL

The modal verb “will” enables us to create the future simple tense:

subject + will + verb + object.

I will leave tomorrow morning.

I will learn English this year.

Forms:

  • I will learn

I’ll learn

I will not learn

I won’t learn

Will I learn?

Will I not learn?

Won’t I learn?

  • You will learn

You’ll learn

You will not learn

You won’t learn

Will you learn?

Will you not learn?

Won’t you learn?

  • He will learn

He’ll learn

He will not learn

He won’t learn

Will he learn?

Will he not learn?

Won’t he learn?

  • She will learn

She’ll learn

She will not learn

She won’t learn

Will she learn?

Will she not learn?

Won’t she learn?

  • It will learn

It’ll learn

It will not learn

It won’t learn

Will it learn?

Will it not learn?

Won’t it learn?

  • We will learn

We’ll learn

We will not learn

We won’t learn

Will we learn?

Will we not learn?

Won’t we learn?

  • You will learn

You’ll learn

You will not learn

You won’t learn

Will you learn?

Will you not learn?

Won’t you learn?

  • They will learn

They’ll learn

They will not learn

They won’t learn

Will they learn?

Will they not learn?

Won’t they learn?

The modal verb “will” is also used to express:

  • a request: Will you help me with this? / Won’t you lend me the car?
  • an offer: I will drive you home. / We will help you with the move.
  • a refusal: I will not let you down. We won’t accept these terms.
  • a conditional: If it snows, I will cancel the trip. I won’t arrive on time if there is traffic.

English Speaking Practise with how many or how much exercises.

Questions and Answers

Do the following how many or how much exercises.

How much is this jacket?

It will cost you £20.

How much will the trousers cost?

They will cost you 20 pounds as well.

How much time do we need to get?

We need about 20 minutes.

How much water do you drink a day?

I drink about 2 litres.

How much did you spend at the shops?

I don’t know how much I spent.

Were there many people at the football match?

Yes, there were many people at the football match.

How many people were there?

I don’t know I think about 20,000, but I am not sure.

May I pay the bill?

No, we will go 50-50.

Will you take the tube?

No, I will walk, it is not very far.

When will another taxi arrive?

I think another taxi will arrive immediately.

Lesson 23 recap with Julia

Hi guys! Welcome back! Today we’re going to do the recap of lesson 23 together! We’re going to use this lesson as a pretext to review the pronunciation of the -S endings. We’ve seen this before but we’re going to use examples taken from today’s dialogue and grammar points. We’re going to practice the pronunciation of plurals and the third person singular of present simple.

Let’s start off with /s/ then we will do /z/ and finally we’ll see /iz/

/s/

toothpicks

highlights

stops

/z/

things

spoons

bills

/iz/ dishes

Let’s run through today’s vocabulary!

Please repeat after me!

a station

a flat

to wave

number

immediately

to mind

to jump

In England we will say: “a flat”. Sometimes people won’t understand you, depending on where you are speaking English So do also learn the word: “apartment” (1″P”).

Now let’s do a grammar review together! Today your grammar point was about countable nouns and uncountable nouns. So in today’s exercise I would like you to complete the phrase with “many” or “much”

Just as a recap:

“much” is for uncountable nouns

“many” is for countable nouns

energy: much energy

people: many people

time: much time

times: many times

traffic: much traffic

cars: many cars

food: much food

meals: many meals

how much is it?

how much is needed?

how many are needed?

That’s it for today guys!

Thanks for watching!

I look forward to seeing you next time! Bye for now!

Present progressive English explained in the Beginners Course 16.
Prepositions of place exercises and explanation in English 17
Prepositions of place location In English Beginners Course Lesson 18.
Prepositions of time explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 19
Prepositions of time list explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 20
Modal Verbs explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 21
Phrasal Verbs explained English Beginners Course Lesson 22
How many or how much exercises in English Beginners Course Lesson 23
The form and use of the imperative in English beginners Course 24
The verb to get in English Beginners Course Lesson 25.
Make or do exercises pdf English Beginners Course Lesson 26
Do did past simple explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 27
the simple past of to be questions English Beginners Course Lesson 28
Past simple of to have English Course Lesson 29
Regular verbs in the simple past explained in the English Course Lesson 30

Exercises Lesson 23

Comprehension Practice

Vocabulary Practice

Grammar Practice


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Berkeley University of California




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