Countable nouns vs uncountable nouns explained in English Beginners 12.




This English tutorial is focusing on “How much” and “How many” countable nouns vs uncountable nouns.

Dialogue

English Beginners Course Lesson
how much, how many
countable and uncountable nouns

1/ English Sentence Practice with countable nouns vs uncountable nouns.

MAN: The dog runs in the park. I have a dog. There are many dogs in the park.

WOMAN: They run in the park because it is safe.

MAN: It is not safe to run on the road. There are many cars on the road. There is too much traffic.

GIRL: I have many friends, I have one, two, three friends.

MAN: I do not have much time. I can count my many friends but I can’t count time.

WOMAN: I have many tasks and I have too much work. I can count my tasks. I clean, I cook, I learn. I can’t count my work.

MAN: If I can count something, I can say “many”. If I can’t count something, I say “much”. One, Two, Three…

OTHER MEN: Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve. How much time?

WOMAN: How many minutes?

MAN: I learn English with my teacher.

GIRL: I run in the park with my dog.

WOMAN: There are many students at my school. There is not much work today.

English Vocabulary

2/ Vocabulary Practice

  • the dog runs
  • in the park
  • Many
  • many dogs
  • safe
  • to be safe
  • it is not safe
  • a road roads
  • on the road
  • much
  • too much traffic
  • a friend friends
  • to have many friends
  • much time
  • to count
  • I can count
  • to count something
  • a task – tasks
  • to clean
  • to cook
  • to learn
  • time
  • minutes
  • How much time?
  • How many minutes?
  • there is
  • there are
  • many students
  • at school
  • not much work
  • One, Two, Three
  • Four, Five, Six
  • Seven, Eight, Nine
  • Ten, Eleven, Twelve

English Grammar

“Many” or “much”?

Countable nouns vs uncountable nouns, nouns can be put into different categories such as plural and singular, but also countable and countable.

Countable nouns = we can count them

They have a singular and a plural form.

i.e.

“car” is a countable noun

a car

cars, two cars…

The car is mine.

The cars are his.

Uncountable nouns = we can’t count them

They only have one form, the singular form. They do not have a plural form so they always use a singular verb. They cannot use the articles “a”, “an” or a number (one, two, three…) before them.

i.e.

“butter” is an uncountable noun

butter

butters (does not exist)

a butter (does not exist)

two butters (does not exist)

Countable nouns vs uncountable nouns; Countable nouns are very common (a sister, a classroom, a friend, a teacher…). So how can I recognise uncountable nouns?

Uncountable nouns are often:

  • abstract ideas: love, beauty…
  • liquids or gases: water, milk, air, coffee…
  • materials: wood, gold, paper…
  • food (certain foods generally cut into small parts): bread, cheese, pasta…
  • made of smaller parts: sugar, rice…
  • others: advice, work, news, furniture, information, luggage, money…

When we are talking about a large or small quantity we can use “lots of” or “a lot of” with countable nouns vs uncountable nouns:

  • “language” is a countable noun: I speak lots of languages. I speak a lot of languages. / I don’t speak lots of languages. I don’t speak a lot of languages.
  • “coffee” is an uncountable noun: I drink lots of coffee. I drink a lot of coffee. / I don’t drink lots of coffee. I don’t drink a lot of coffee.

We can also use “many” with countable nouns and “much” with uncountable nouns, when talking about a large or small quantity (in a positive or a negative statement):

  • lesson” is a countable noun: I have lots of English lessons. I have a lot of English lessons. > I have many English lessons./ I don’t have lots of English lessons. I don’t have a lot of English lessons. I don’t have many English lessons.
  • work” is an uncountable noun: I have lots of work. I have a lot of work. > I have much work. / I don’t have lots of work. I don’t have a lot of work. I don’t have much work.

English Speaking Practise

Questions and Answers

When do you say “many”?

I say “many” when I can count.

What do you mean?

There are many cats. I can count cats, one, two, three.

Can I count “work”, one work, two works?

No, you cannot count “work”.

So, do I say “many work” or “much work”?

You say “much work”.

Do you have much money?

No, I don’t.

And who do you learn English with?

I learn English with my teacher.

Where do you run?

I run in the park.

Why do you run in the park?

I run in the park because it is safe.

Are there cars in the park?

No, there are no cars in the park that is why I run in the park.

Are there many students at school?

Yes, there are many students at school.

Lesson Recap with Julia ​​

Hi guys! Welcome back!
Let’s do the recap of lesson 12 together!
Let’s start off with something super easy: counting.
Then we look at the grammar point together. We’ll do a quick recap and then we’ll look at today’s vocabulary.

So let’s start off with counting.
Count with me from one to twelve!

  1. one
  2. two
  3. three
  4. four
  5. five
  6. six
  7. seven
  8. eight (Be careful here with the spelling)
  9. nine
  10. ten
  11. eleven
  12. twelve

So there are no major pronunciation difficulties there. It’s more the spelling that can cause problems.
Do practise! I know it’s easy and so I don’t want to sound patronising. But do practise because I think that for example “eight” and “twelve” aren’t that easy to spell, to write.
So practise writing them.

Now let’s look at the grammar point countable and uncountable nouns!

Let’s start off with “uncountable”:
When it’s an uncountable noun, we will use “much” or “how much?”:
time, energy, work…
We’re going to say:
how much time?
how much work?
how much energy?

When it’s countable, we’re going to use “many”, “how many?”
How many friends?
how many students?
how many times?

Try to write some sentences. Create some sentences. For example:
there is too much traffic
there are too many colours here
Try to make some sentences to practise countable and uncountable nouns. You can use the vocabulary from this video, from your lesson also. But you can also experiment and try new sentences, new words and see if you get it right.

is it countable? is it uncountable? Generally it’s quite logical. But you will also identify that logic and apply it through practice.
So get some practice!

Finally let’s look at today’s vocabulary:
So here’s one of my favourites: “minute
And the plural is: “minutes“.
Repeat after me:
minute – minutes

A few easy words:
to cook
to clean
a roadside
a park

Last word for today:
task – tasks
That’s not easy so repeat after me!
task – tasks
Once more:
task – tasks

Thanks for watching this video! That’s all for today!
I’ll see you soon! Bye bye!

The Verb to be in English Beginners Course Lesson 1.
The verb to be in negative form English Beginners Course Lesson 2
Verb to be questions English Beginners Course Lesson 3
What why how when where who in English Beginners course lesson 4
Possessive adjectives explained English Beginners course Lesson 5.
Explaining Adjectives and adverbs in English Beginners course Lesson 6
Some any every exercise explained in our English Beginners Course 7.
Possessive pronouns explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 8
The modal verb can explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 9.
Positive present simple explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 10
Questions in the negative form explained in English Beginners Course 11.
Countable nouns vs uncountable nouns explained in English Beginners 12.
Positive form of present simple explained in English Beginners Course 13.
Present simple tense explained in English Beginners Course Lesson 14
The form of present continuous explained in English Beginners Course 15.

Anaheim University

Exercises Lesson 12

Comprehension Practice

Vocabulary Practice

Grammar Practice



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