Lesson 64 –  A Brand New Car – Present perfect: Yet, Already, just

LEVEL B2 – A BRAND NEW CAR


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IN YOUR LANGUAGE (Top right > Select language > Click on the flags).


 

VOCABULARY 

  • Had a bit of luck
  • She entered a prize draw
  • With the hope of winning
  • State of the art
  • Home entertainment system
  • She has just found out
  • She has won the top prize
  • The only problem is
  • Hasn’t learnt how to drive
  • Attending a driving school
  • The first time round
  • To give her some driving lessons
  • There is no answer
  • On her way to work
  • She has just finished work
  • Before she returns home
  • That’s a shame
  • Left it in her car
  • I have tried to
  • Is there anything I can help you with?
  • I have just won a car
  • I don’t know how to drive
  • To supplement
  • Will be happy to help
  • Have you just called me?
  • I have some exciting news
  • I was hoping that
  • I’m a bit busy this week
  • I’m free at the weekend
  • This is going to be a great help
  • Don’t be silly
  • I’m glad to help
  • May I suggest that
  • The Highway Code
  • Driving requires a lot of concentration
  • It’s important to know
  • I couldn’t agree more
  • Driving theory book
  • A while back
  • I have already read it
  • Burnt into my brain
  • That sounds perfect
  • You are a real pal
  • I’m so excited

 

LESSON 64 DIALOGUE 

-A Brand New Car-

 

 

 

 

Lesson 64 – A Brand New Car

Paula has recently had a bit of luck. She entered a prize draw with the hope of winning a state of the art home entertainment system. She hasn’t won the entertainment system; instead she has just found out that she has won the top prize, a car. The only problem is that Paula hasn’t learnt how to drive. Attending a driving school can be expensive so it is important that Paula passes her test the first time round. She decides to ask her friend, Lucy, to give her some driving lessons. She calls Lucy on her mobile phone but there is no answer. She decides to call round to Lucy’s house on her way to work.

(Doorbell rings)

Paula: Oh, hi Dean. Is Lucy here?

Dean: Hi Paula. I’m afraid not. She has just finished work but it will be half an hour before she returns home.

Paula: That’s a shame. I called her mobile but there was no answer.

Dean: No, she has probably left it in her car. I have tried to call her several times this morning. Is there anything I can help you with?

Paula: Well, I have just won a car but I don’t know how to drive. I was wondering if Lucy could give me some lessons to supplement the classes at the driving school.

Dean: Oh wow! That’s amazing! Congratulations Paula. I’m sure Lucy will be happy to help you with your driving lessons.

(Paula’s mobile phone rings)

Paula: Hello?

Lucy: Hi Paula. It’s Lucy. Have you just called me?

Paula: Hi Lucy. Yes, I’ve just called you. I have some exciting news, I have won a car.

Lucy: Paula, that’s great. Congratulations! Oh wait; you can’t drive, can you?

Paula: Well, not yet. I was hoping that you would give me some lessons.

Lucy: Of course! I’m a bit busy this week but I’m free at the weekend. We could drive around for a couple of hours. See how you feel.

Paula: Lucy, Thank you so much. This is going to be a great help. You’re the best.

Lucy: Don’t be silly. I’m glad to help. May I suggest that you read up on the Highway Code and traffic signs beforehand? It’s not that I don’t trust you but driving requires a lot of concentration and it’s important to know your way around the traffic system.

Paula: I couldn’t agree more. I bought a driving theory book a while back. I have already read it but I’ll read it again and again until it’s burnt into my brain.

Lucy: That’s the spirit! Okay, so how about 2 o’clock on Saturday afternoon?

Paula: That sounds perfect. Thank you again Lucy. You are a real pal.

(Paula hangs up the phone)

Dean: I knew she’d help. Good luck with your driving lessons, Paula

Paula: Thanks Dean, I’m so excited! I’ll see you on Saturday. Goodbye.

 

Facts: The first driver’s licence was issued to Karl Benz, inventor of the modern automobile, in 1888. He had to receive written permission from the authorities to operate his car on public roads after residents complained about the noise and smell of his Motorwagen.

 

 

COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (3 to complete)

 

Interactive Video Comprehension Quiz 1


Summary Statements Comprehension Quiz 2

Drag and Drop Quiz 3: 

GRAMMAR PRACTICE: PRESENT PERFECT – JUST/ALREADY/YET 

The present perfect is formed as so::

 

Present to have + past participle

Example:

To finish

I have finished
You have finished
He has finished
She has finished
It has finished
We have finished
They have finished

Normally, the past participle ends in –ed but there is a long list of irregular verbs:

Infinitive Irregular Past Participle Infinitive Irregular Past Participle
Begin Begun Leave Left
Break Broken Lose Lost
Bring Brought Make Made
Build Built Meet Met
Buy Bought Pay Paid
Catch Caught Put Put
Come Come Read Read
Do Done Ring Rung
Drink Drunk Say Said
Eat Eaten See Seen
Fall Fallen Sell Sold
Find Found Sit Sat
Fly Flown Sleep Slept
Forget Forgotten Speak Spoken
Get Got Stand Stood
Give Given Take Taken
Go Gone Tell Told
Have Had Think Thought
Hear Heard Win Won
Know Known Write Written

Examples:

To Win

I have won
You have won
He has won
She has won
It has won
We have won
They have won

Remember: We use the present perfect in the following situations:

 

1. When we talk about actions that happen in a period of time that continues from the past until now:

I have travelled to a lot of places, but I haven’t been to Japan yet.

That’s the reason this tense tends to appear with expressions like so far, until now, since this morning, in the last few years, etc:

Paula hadn’t thought about learning to drive until now.

I’ve flown to a lot of places in the last few years.

At the same time, we use the present perfect with unfinished periods of time like today, this month, this year:

Have you met any new people this year?

I haven’t had lunch today.

 

 

2. We can use the present perfect with justalready and yet:

Just A short time ago
Already Action that has been completed, normally before expected
Yet Up to now (Only in negative and interrogative sentences)

“Were you waiting long?”

“No, I’ve just got here”

“Where’s Michael?”

He’s already left

 

3. When we talk about new information:

I’ve won a prize!

My sister has recently had a baby.

4. When we talk about an action that has a result now:

The streets are flooded. It’s rained a lot.

John and Mary have broken up. It’s very sad.

 

5. When we express if an action happens for the first, second, etc. time:

It’s the second time I have read this book. It’s brilliant.

She’s scared because it’s the first time she has driven a car.

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE 

  • Related Pronunciation Video Lesson and interactive exercise(s):

BACK TO A1 COURSE INDEX         –       NEXT LESSON HERE

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