lección 40

Introducción

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Diálogo

1/Sentence Practice

John has been to the doctor. He has already done all the tests. He has received the results.

He has just been to the doctors. The doctor has not checked all the results yet.

He has never had any health problems. Although he hasn’t been feeling well for some time.

He has been working too hard. He will have to take it easy. He has taken an appointment with a specialist.

He just saw his general practitioner. He has been looking at the doctors who are known in their field.

How long have you been feeling unwell? I have not been well for a couple of months.

I was too busy to do anything about it. What do you think is wrong?

I don’t think it is serious but I am going to book you in for a scan at the hospital.

Better safe than sorry. I think you are just exhausted but we will know more soon.

Do you need a sick note for your work? No that will be alright and I have very good medical insurance.

Do not worry too much, when we are sure that everything is OK. Work less and play more.

Do Hobbies and take more leisure time. Hobbies like painting, bicycle riding, photography, walking, playing a musical instrument. These are all great ways to relax and help your body repair itself.

First things first, my secretary will make you an appointment for the scan.

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Vocabulario

2/Vocabulary Practice

  • Present perfect simple
  • present perfect continuous
  • To go to the doctor
  • to do the tests.
  • He has just been to the doctors.
  • to check
  • all the results
  •  health problems.
  • for some time.
  • to work too hard.
  • to take it easy.
  • to take an appointment
  • a specialist.
  • a general practitioner.
  • known in their field.
  • a couple of months.
  • too busy
  • to do anything about it.
  • What do you think is wrong?
  • serious
  • to book you in for
  • Better safe than sorry.
  • to be exhausted
  • to now more soon.
  • a sick note
  • to be alright
  • medical insurance.
  • too much,
  • Work less and play more.
  • Do Hobbies
  • take more leisure time
  • painting
  • bicycle riding
  • photography
  • walking
  • playing a musical instrument
  •  ways to relax
  • to repair itself.
  • First things first,
  • my secretary
  • to make you an appointment
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Gramática

present perfect continuous = present perfect progressive followed by Present perfect simple review

 

present perfect continuous = present perfect progressive

 

Form: have / has  been + present participle (-ing form)

 

Forms:

 

Affirmative form:

Have / Has + been + present participle

 

I have been learning

You have been learning

He has been learning

She has been learning

It has been raining

We have been learning

You have been learning

They have been learning

 

Affirmative form:

‘ve / ‘s + been + present participle

 

I’ve been learning

You’ve been learning

He’s been learning

She’s been learning

It’s been raining

We’ve been learning

You’ve been learning

They’ve been learning

 

Negative  form:

Have / Has + not + been + present participle

 

I have not been learning

You have not been learning

He has not been learning

She has not been learning

It has not been raining

We have not been learning

You have not been learning

They have not been learning

 

Negative  form:

‘ve / ‘s + not + been + present participle

 

I’ve not been learning

You’ve not been learning

He’s not been learning

She’s not been learning

It’s not been raining

We’ve not been learning

You’ve not been learning

They’ve not been learning

 

Negative  form:

haven’t / hasn’t + been + present participle

 

I haven’t been learning

You haven’t been learning

He hasn’t been learning

She hasn’t been learning

It hasn’t been raining

We haven’t been learning

You haven’t been learning

They haven’t been learning

 

Interrogative form

Have / Has + S + present participle + ?

 

Have I been learning?

Have you been learning?

Has he been learning?

Has she been learning?

Has it been raining?

Have we been learning?

Have you been learning?

Have they been learning?

 

Negative Interrogative form

Have / Has + S + not + present participle + ?

 

Have I not been learning?

Have you not been learning?

Has he not been learning?

Has she not been learning?

Has it not been raining?

Have we not been learning?

Have you not been learning?

Have they not been learning?

 

Negative Interrogative form

Haven’t / Hasn’t + S + present participle + ?

Haven’t I been learning?

Haven’t you been learning?

Hasn’t he been learning?

Hasn’t she been learning?

Hasn’t it been raining?

Haven’t we been learning?

Haven’t you been learning?

Haven’t they been learning?



Use

1/ when we focus on the duration of an action in the past:

I have been learning for 4 years.

 

2/ when the action is recent:

He has been practising a lot lately.

 

3/ when the influence of the action is still felt in the present:

I have been feeling ill this week.



Signal Words that are used with the present perfect continuous:

all

the whole

for

since

recently

lately

 

Examples with present perfect continuous:

I have been listening all the time.

During the whole journey I have been listening to music.

I have been wondering what to study for a while.

Since I left university I have been looking for a job.

I have been looking for a new flat recently .

I have been feeling unwell lately.

 

Be careful:

1/ Review the spelling of the past participle

2/ Non continuous verbs can’t be used in this tense: “to have” (I have been having a good time. > WRONG / I have had a good time. > CORRECT / I had a good time.…. > CORRECT)

3/ Get practice placing the adverb in your sentence using the present perfect continuous.

 

And do also be careful with the present perfect simple as often students confuse these tenses! Review time > Present Perfect Simple!

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Preguntas y repuestas

 

Questions and Answers

Where has John been?

John has been to the doctor.

 

Has he done all the tests?

Yes, he has done all the test.

 

Has he got the results back?

Yes, he had the results back yesterday.

 

Has he ever had health problems?

Well, none that I know of.

 

For how long has he been feeling unwell?

He has been feeling under the weather for a week.

 

Do you need a sick note?

No, my boss trusts me.

 

Do you think it is serious?

No, I think you have been overdoing it.

 

Do I need any medicine?

No, you just have to take it easy for a week or two.

 

Did you see the specialist?

No, I saw a general practitioner.

 

Are you worried about your health?

I suppose I am.

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Pronunciación

Hello and welcome to this video dedicated to the pronunciation of the -S endings.
Now, at the end of my third person singular in the simple present
or at the end of my noun in the plural
I will find an “-S” in most cases.
How do I pronounce this “-S”?
Shall I pronounce it /z/ /s/ /iz/?
Now let’s discover together the rules which are based on sound and not on spelling,
which will help us anticipate the pronunciation of the ending.
So let’s start off with the second column: /s/.
These sounds:
/k/
/f/
/t/
and /p/
are what we call voiceless.
There is no vibration. There is a lot of air.
(Examples)
So after those sounds
we need to pronounce the “-S”: /s/
So there is air. Do you see?
(Examples)
That’s one way of remembering it:
I exhale a lot of air when I pronounce these sounds.
I also exhale air when I pronounce: /s/
so they work together.
That’s quite straightforward.
The first column is quite long: /z/
Many different scenarios here.
I pronounce my “-S”: /z/
So it is voiced. There is a vibration.
When I have a vibration, so let’s just say when it is not /k/, /f/, /t/ o /p/. This is the /s/ column.
it’s the other rule: /z/.
So, /g/
/v/
/ŋ/
/m/
/l/
/d/, /n/ etc.
All those sounds, if there’s an “-S” sound just after
I must pronounce the ending -S: /z/.
(Examples)
So the first rule (/z/) is quite simple.
The third rule
kind of overrides certain sounds.
So we listed all of the sounds except for these.
So if I have any of these sounds just before my “-S” ending,
I have to pronounce my ending “-S”: /iz/.
So I’ve added a vowel.
There’s like an extra syllable.
(Examples)
Why is that?
Because /s/, /z/, /dʒ/, /tʃ/ and /ʃ/
are quite similar to /s/ and /z/.
So we need a vowel to hear the ending.
That’s all for today!
Thanks for watching!
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Exercises Lesson 40

Comprehension Practice

Vocabulary Practice

Grammar Practice

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