fce reading and use of english Skills and Use of English 1




fce reading and use of english Skills 1

Dialogue and fce reading and use of English Skills and Use of English 1

Dialogue 19: Use of English parts

Emma is coming to grips with Use of English which is part of the Reading section. It is yet another part of the exam she feels ill-prepared for as it covers elements such as vocabulary, collocations, shades of meaning, phrasal verbs, and idioms – also called fixed phrases through different types of texts such as newspapers, fiction, and magazines.

EMMA: From what I’ve read about the Use of English, I think it’s going to be the part I’ll struggle with most in the exam.

GORDON: Ok don’t worry Emma, why don’t you tell us what you already know, then we can all discuss tips for tackling this section?

EMMA: Basically, I know there are 7 parts. The first part is ‘multiple-choice cloze’, then there is a part called ‘open cloze’, the third part is ‘word formation’, the fourth part is “sentence transformation”, the fifth is Multiple choice text, the sixth is gapped texts with missing paragraphs, and the seventh is called Multiple matching where you have to find where information is located in a text.

TERRY: Yeah that’s it. So, can you tell us what the different parts involve?

EMMA: Um, yeah. So in multiple-choice cloze, you have to fill in gaps, for each of these gaps, you choose one answer from four. Open cloze is similar, but with this there are no multiple-choice answers so you have to completely rely on your own resourcefulness which means it is more difficult. For word formation, you have to take a stem word and form this to create another word, for example changing an adjective to an adverb by adding the suffix ‘-ly’ or something like that. Then, for sentence transformation, you have a sentence, which is followed by a second sentence containing a gap. You need to use between two to five words to fill in this gap, being sure to use the keyword which will be provided in capitals. Essentially, you are changing the structure of the first sentence but putting across the same meaning.

GORDON: Excellent knowledge of four of the seven sections, Emma. You can study parts five to seven at home. Tell me, how have you been revising so far?

EMMA: Well, I’ve been making sure I’m familiar with lots of linking words and prepositions.

GORDON: Ok, well now we can talk more about specific revision techniques so you know how to revise for all parts.

Vocabulary Reading Skills and Use of English 1

ENGLISHSYNONYM or DEFINITION
to come to grips withto tackle, to deal with, to grasp
ill-preparedinexperienced, inexpert
to struggleto find something difficult, to have difficulty doing something
a tipa piece of advice
to tackleto deal with something, to get to work on, set one’s hands on
a clozea test in which one is asked to supply words that have been removed from a passage in order to measure one’s ability to comprehend text; a “fill in the blanks” type text
to rely onto depend on
resourcefulnessinitiative, inventiveness, self-motivation, creativity
a stem wordroot, main part, origin
to put acrossto communicate, to convey, to make clear
to handleto deal with, to take care of, to attend to, to sort out
a prefixan element placed at the beginning of a word to adjust or quality its meaning
a suffixan element placed at the end of a word to adjust or qualify its meaning
an idioman expression, a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words

Exam tips Reading Skills and Use of English 1

EXAM TIP FOR First Reading Skills and Use of English 1

Commonly misspelled words. Here is the first half of some of the most commonly misspelled words in American and British English.

A-B

absence

acceptable

accidentally

accommodate

achieve

acknowledge

acquaintance

acquire

acquit

acreage

address

adultery

advisable

affect

aggression

aggressive

allegiance

almost

a lot

amateur

annually

apparent

arctic

argument

atheist

awful

because

becoming

beginning

believe

bellwether

buoy/buoyant

business

C-D

calendar

camouflage

capitol  capital (both words exist)

Caribbean

category

caught

cemetery

changeable

chief

colleague

column

coming

committed

concede

congratulate

conscientious

conscious

consensus

controversy

coolly

daiquiri

deceive

definite

definitely

desperate

difference

dilemma

disappoint

disastrous

drunkenness

dumbbell

E-H

embarrass

equipment

exceed

exhilarate

existence

experience

extreme

fascinating

fiery

fluorescent

foreign

friend

fulfil  fullfil

gauge

grateful

guarantee

guidance

harass

height

hierarchy

hors d’oeuvres

humorous

hygiene

hypocrisy/hypocrite

I-K

ignorance

imitate

immediately

independent

indispensable

inoculate

intelligence

jewelry (UK: jewellery)

judgment

kernel

L-O

leisure

liaison

library

license  lisence (US always license)

lightning

lose  loose

maintenance

medieval

memento

millennium

miniature

minuscule

mischievous

misspell

necessary

niece

neighbor, neighbour

noticeable

occasion

occasionally

occurrence

occurred

omission

original

outrageous

Grammar and Vocabulary recommended Videos for fce reading and use of English.



cambridge b2 listening practice
b2 first practice test
fce-listening-test-pdf
b2 first reading
first certificate listening
first certificate
first certificate practice
first certificate handbook
first certificate exams
b2 first handbook
b2 first for schools
fce reading and use of english
cambridge first exam link

Exercises First Reading Skills and Use of English 1

Vocabulary Exercise

Comprehension Exercise

Grammar Exercise


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